Life takes many twists and turns and even with a clear vision and a sense of purpose some events leave us stumped!

We can find ourselves either reacting to these events with confusion and disbelief, retracting in fear and uncertainty or responding with a sense of curiosity and exploration, propelling us forward.

While we might review our spending from time to time or compare insurance providers, even scour online deals looking for a bargain. When it comes to your life, where you work, who you spend time with, being clear about what you need and value is the difference between creating your best life or just getting by!

Underneath the myriad of perceptions, beliefs and emotional responses from the library of inner memories, ways of coping, lies the space in between that once examined allows for perspective shifts and a reset.

Choices

Yes, that’s right, you do have choices and you can design your life the way you want it to be even if you can’t perceive it yet.

The first steps are by taking an honest look at what is happening in your life right now, measure your satisfaction with current reality and clarify how you would like it to be.

Developing your strategy and making it happen are often the challenge points and essential to experience the desired outcome.

Organise and Prioritise

Before you can prioritize, you must first organize. There is no one way to organize life or prioritise what has value and meaning, and whatever system or values you choose, they must make sense to you to reap maximum benefits, it’s your life after all.

Ink it

Really connecting with yourself requires some time, headspace and a way to capture your thoughts and build your plan.

Technology has become so prevalent in our lives that it is almost impossible to get anything done without the help of a computer. Putting pen to paper stimulates the brain like nothing else, even in this age of e-mails, texts and tweets.

Writing by hand really connects you with the words and allows your brain to focus on them, understand them, and learn from them. In fact, learning to write in cursive is shown to improve brain development in the areas of thinking, language and working memory. Cursive handwriting stimulates brain synapses and synchronicity between the left and right hemispheres, something absent from printing and typing.

Calm the Fear and Uncertainty

Writing can actually calm your brain down, which makes it a perfect winding-down activity at night.

According to graphologist and handwriting expert Dr. Marc Seifer, Jotting down a sentence like, ‘I will be more peaceful’at least 20 times per day can actually have an impact, especially on those with attention deficit disorder.” “This actually calms the person down and retrains the brain,” Seifer says.

It also helps keep you more focused, which will naturally un-frazzle your brain from distractions.

Chunking – Break it down

Chunking refers to grouping information as an approach to more efficient use of short-term memory. Chunking breaks up big pieces of information into smaller units or chunks. The benefit when applied to a strategy or a plan is enabling more effective activation and clarity on the smaller steps.

The Power to create Value and Meaning

According to Developmental Psychology value is a special kind of importance that goes beyond survival and biological needs. To value is to make people, things, and ideas important enough to appreciate, nurture, and protect. We create meaning and purpose in our lives by honoring the value we bestow on people, objects, concepts, behaviours, and some notion of a higher power.

According to Dr Stosny, high value investment increases meaning, purpose, and vitality, with stronger motivations to create, build, improve, appreciate, connect, and protect. It literally boosts the immune system and makes us physically healthier. As value investment declines, so does vitality, motivation, meaning, purpose, and health. You begin to function more on automatic pilot with less interest and positive energy. If it declines too far, you begin to feel numb or depressed. If it declines drastically, you lose the will to live.

 

GUEST BLOGGER:  Vanessa Auditore | Psychologist